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Roxanne Christy
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How to Take Care of the American Flag

June 29, 2017 2:30 am

You may want to show patriotism by flying an American flag outside your home. But do you know there are official rules on properly displaying the U.S. flag? Read the following tips from USAGov to take proper care of your red white and blue.

When: You can display the flag outside from sunrise to sunset. If you want to fly it after dark, it will need to be lit. Don't fly the flag during inclement weather, unless it's an all-weather flag.

On the porch: The union of the flag--the blue section with white stars--should be placed at the peak of the staff unless the flag is at half-staff. When the flag is suspended from a rope on a pole extending from a house, the flag should be hoisted out, union first, from the building.

On the wall or the window: When the flag is displayed on a flat surface like a wall, the union should be at the top left.

On the street: The flag should be suspended vertically with the union to the north in an east and west street or to the east in a north and south street. The flag should never touch anything beneath it, so make sure it's hoisted at the proper height.

At the office: Suspend the flag vertically with the union to the observer's left upon entering. If the building has more than one main entrance, the flag should be suspended vertically near the center of the corridor or lobby with the union to the north when entrances are to the east and west, or to the east when entrances are to the north and south. If there are entrances in more than two directions, the union should be to the east.

On a vehicle: The staff should be fixed firmly on the right side of the vehicle. Do not drape the flag over the hood, top, sides, or back of a vehicle or a boat.

Half-staff: During periods of mourning, it's common to see the flag flying at half-staff. Only presidents can proclaim such periods for a national remembrance. Governors can also declare mourning periods at a local level. In some cases, heads of federal agencies can order the flag flown at half-staff on grounds under their supervision. Traditionally, states and local governments follow the president's proclamation during a period of national mourning.

Source: USAGov

Published with permission from RISMedia.